Five great reasons to choose independent living for your loved ones.

Watching parents lose their independence as they age is one of the most challenging realities we face. About 14 percent of all people over age 65 have two to three chronic conditions that erode their ability to live independently. Fortunately, options are far more varied than the antiquated view of an “old folks home.” When the timing is right, begin a gentle conversation with your parents about their choices and decisions. Here are five benefits of moving to a community designed especially for them. Safety Assisted living communities are set up to provide a safe, comfortable environment for aging loved ones. You don’t have to worry about a dangerous fall down the stairs. And your parents don’t have to worry about hiring someone to fix a leak or shovel the snow on the sidewalk. The team at Chestnut Ridge encourages residents to remain as independent as possible, but we take care of the details to ensure their health and safety. Meals A healthy diet is more important than ever. At Chestnut Ridge, every meal is homemade for the added comfort and emotional well-being of our residents. One of the amenities we offer is a large dining room that leads to a newly remodeled patio, as well as a private dining room for on-site family gatherings. Transportation Many senior citizens can no longer drive (or choose not to). We can arrange transportation for residents to get to nearby events and appointments. But with all of the options available on site, your parent may not ever want to leave the community! Socialization A good community doesn’t force involvement, but rather encourages residents to try different activities. Socialization is perhaps the prime reason why those who initially believe that they won’t like the change end up thriving. When lifelong friends are no longer around, it’s easy for loneliness and depression to set in. Chestnut Ridge offers the opportunity for your loved once to once again enjoy the company of peers. They can play cards, listen to music, exercise, enjoy the Juice Bar, attend community events and more. Medical care At Chestnut Ridge, independent living residents can opt to seek medical assistance whenever it’s needed. When residents feel ill and wish to go to the doctor, they have convenient access to nearby medical practices. Should a fall or other emergency occur in the building, our team would immediately call 911 and stay until EMTs arrive. While moving to a community that provides assistance with daily living may not be the answer for everyone, the choice certainly helps many lead healthier, happier...

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We need to talk about Alzheimer’s.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, one in ten Americans have had a family member with Alzheimer’s. The disease damages pathways between the brain’s nerve cells, which may cause memory failure, personality changes and difficulty with daily activities. As it progresses, those with Alzheimer’s will require more assistance with daily living. A person’s ability to communicate may also be affected. Ongoing communication with your loved one is important, no matter how difficult it may become. While someone with Alzheimer’s or a related form of dementia may not seem engaged in every conversation, he or she still requires your love and support. Here are some tips for communicating with an individual diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. DO be patient and reassuring. Having to correct and repeat information often can become frustrating, but try to practice 100% forgiveness and don’t take things personally. DON’T try to reason, argue or confront. Try going with the flow instead. You can redirect the person to a new subject or activity more easily by agreeing than you can by arguing. DO be aware of nonverbal communication. Your facial expressions, tone of voice, feelings and attitude will have a significant impact on your conversation. Use a gentle, lower pitch. DON’T ignore your friend or family member. Talk directly to him or her, even if they don’t seem engaged in the conversation. Avoid talking about them as if they weren’t there. Everyone deserves respect. DO use visual cues. Point or touch an item you want the individual to use, or demonstrate a task. Written notes could also be helpful. DON’T use complicated sentences or questions. Drawn-out requests can be overwhelming. If possible, provide the solution rather than the question. For example: “Here is some milk” instead of “Are you thirsty?” Stay involved! Join a support group, or follow @AlzChat on Twitter for weekly discussions about the care and challenges of living with Alzheimer’s. About 80% of our residents have been diagnosed with some form of Alzheimer’s or dementia. The team at Chestnut Ridge is committed to working with families to provide the best possible care. Your loved one is not alone. And neither are you. Do Not Ask Me to Remember Do not ask me to remember, Don’t try to make me understand, Let me rest and know you’re with me, Kiss my cheek and hold my hand. I’m confused beyond your concept, I am sad and sick and lost. All I know is that I need you To be with me at all cost. Do not lose your patience with me, Do not scold or curse or cry. I can’t help the way I’m acting, Can’t be different though I try. Just remember that I need you, That the best of me is gone, Please don’t fail to stand beside me, Love me ’til my life is done. – Owen...

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